Triumphus pacis Osnabruggensis et Noribergensis; Tubingen, Brunnius (1649)

The case for smashing borders

Triumphus pacis Osnabruggensis et Noribergensis; Tubingen, Brunnius (1649)

The Peace of Westphalia: Triumphus pacis Osnabruggensis et Noribergensis; Tubingen, Brunnius (1649)

Originally posted at The Charnel-House.

J.A. Myerson has an article up over at Jacobin making “The Case for Open Borders.”  As an historical overview, it’s not terrible, even if the way it retains the language of “consecration” for the modern period is a bit tendentious.  Borders and rights are not “consecrated” as divine rights but “legitimated” as civil rights.  There’s some acknowledgement of this fact, at least initially, but the author goes on to undermine this distinction in advocating “universal human rights, consecrated in struggle, enforced by solidarity.”

On a related note — why does “solidarity” always seem to enter in as this kind of quasi-mystical force by which we can simply express our sympathy with various remote causes and thereby consider our political obligations fulfilled? This, far more than any kind of legal procedure defining and establishing borders, strikes me as almost religious.  It’s akin to the sentiment expressed by those of various religious persuasions who’ll reassure you that they’re praying for you, etc. Read More